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20110710
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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
with a heartbreaker tonight. we'll show you the apology in the last paper and what it might mean for rupert murdoch. [ man ] i got this new citi thankyou card and started earning loads of points. you got a weather balloon with points? yes i did. [ man ] points i could use for just about anything. ♪ ♪ there it is. [ man ] so i used mine to get a whole new perspective. ♪ [ male announcer ] the new citi thankyou premier card gives you more ways to earn points. what's your story? citi can help you write it. >>> there's word tonight that the san francisco police union has voted to accept a deal with the city that will allow them to receive raises and avoid layoffs while paying more for their pensions. the chronicle is reporting police will get a 3% pay raise immediately. the remaining 2% next year. the deal also requires police to pay an additional 3% to their pensions. this year it's a wash, it's supposed to save the city $10 million over the next two years. trying to get a pension reform measure on the ballot in november. in 2009 there were 52 members of the san francisco police department who m
in london tonight in the hacking scandal that put rupert murdoch's "news of the world" out of business. we'll get the latest from nbc's kier simmons. >> reporter: after the final edition of the "news of the world" off the presses the paper showed off its front page. its headlines "thank you and good-bye." the 168-year-old tabloid that thrived on scandal, shamed celebrities and brought down politicians was brought down by a scandal of its own making involving allegations of bribery and voice mail hacking that one paper has dubbed britain's watergate. three people have been arrested so far, including the paper's former editor who was once a key aide to british prime minister david cameron. tonight he is out on bail. >> i think it's a very sad day for the "news of the world." >> reporter: this weekend the paper's owner, the media titan rupert murdoch, whose holdings include the fox television network and the "wall street journal" arrives in london to deal with the crisis personally. the paper is being investigated for paying police and hacking into people's private cell phone messages. among
edition is printed and as rupert murdoch rushes to loloon, trying to protect his media empire. >>> winning the war? tonight, the stunning statement by the new defense secretary. what he's now saying about al qaeda. >>> courage and candor. rerembering the first lady who bravely spoke about that moment her husband and family confronted her about addictiti. >>> on the red carpet. prince william and kate in california tonight. this evening, british royalty, meeting hollywood's royalty. tom hanks to barbra streisand. who is on the list tonight? >>> and payday. on a day of baseball history. >> that is struck deep to left field. >> the fans actually getting paid to watch this historic home run. >>> good evening on this saturday night. as we come on the air this evening, the printing press is coming to a halt. the last of the papers coming off the press at "the news of the world," that now infamous british tabloid. rocked by revelations its reporters bribed police and eavesdropped on everyone, from the royals to everyday victims of crime. here is the final front page tonight. thank you and good-by
edition of britain's "news of the world" on the stands rupert murdoch arrived in london today. his company's british subsidiary closed it after news that they hacked the phone of a teenager who was dead. >>> a strong earthquake rocked japan's northeastern quake. today's 7.1 tremor prompted tsunami add advisories later canceled. there are no reports of injuries or damage. >>> china no longer a rising world power. instead china has arrived. those words today from the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff admiral mike mullen in beijing in a four-week visit. china's growing military strength comes with an obligation to the world. >> greater military power must come greater responsibility, greater cooperation and just as important, greater transparency. without these things the expansion of military power in your region rather than making it more secure and stable, could have the opposite effect. >> this china trip is one of admiral mullen's final acts as joint chiefs chairman. he retires this fall. now to the white house where in just four hours, heated deficit reduction talks could further in
titan rupert murdoch. it was a big day for sales this morning as they said thanks and good-bye. >> yeah. there was a lot of interest. of course, some organizations are actually calling for a boycott today to show their fury at what happened. last week, let's remember, this was the biggest selling pap ner britain with an unrivaled reputation for journalistic scoop spots. the press itself fell silent this morning for the final time. and this is the last edition. so it has been a very long week on what we call fleet street here in britain. it's also been a very uncomfortable week for media boss rupert murdoch. >> reporter: for millions in britain, sunday morning involves a walk to the news agent to pick up "news of the world." a ritual their parents, grandparents, even great grandparents would recognize. but with thank you and good-bye, today is their last chance. the 168-year-old tabloid that thrived on scandal and exposie ing hypocrisy has itself been destroyed by a scandal of its own. the paper is being investigated for paying police for information and allegation of voice mail hacking.
" on the stands, rupert murdoch is hoping to limit the damage to his media empire. murdoch arrived in london today. his company's british subsidiary closed yours truly news of the world" after reports the newspaper hacked the phone of a missing teenager who was later found dead. stay with us for reports from london later on this hour. >>> a strong earthquake rocked japan's northeastern coast today. this is the same region devastated by a quake and tsunami earlier this year. today's 7.0 tremor prompted tsunami advisories that were later canceled. so far there have been no reports of injuries or damage. tremors were felt as far away as tokyo. >>> china no longer a rising world power. instead, china has arrived. those words today from the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff admiral mike mullen. he is in beijing on a four-day visit. mullen told a university audience china's growing military strength comes with an obligation to the world. >> with greater military power must come greater responsibility, greater cooperation and just as important, greater transparency. without these things the expansion
of news. rupert murdoch is back in london and the end of a newspaper. >> of sites will be at a table this evening to work on that deficit. >> we are still looking at some overcast skies. >> we're looking out at walnut creek and see lots of sunshine for everyone. this is current temperatures in walnut creek. this is cell look of when and how we can expect the fog and clouds to disappear. this is a look of temperatures are later on this afternoon >> in the headlines this afternoon the three men are found dead in an apartment and they are looking for a mode of. and happened saturday afternoon at a public housing development. >> family members mourn the death outside the aum badly inside police are trying to find out what led to a shooting. this emotional young man tried to enter the house where his brother lived. it happened in richmond on triangle court. >> wanted it is a small room is going to be a long process to find out what happened here >> only one of the three people dead live at the apartment. the police held a one suspect and our listing him as a person of interest. their name
dad did, my grandfather did and it's what we do today. from the embattled press baron rupert murdoch to the polo playing prince william and his bride stories with the british connection have been very much in the news this past week. ben tracy will have more on the royal tour of california. but first elizabeth palmer in london with the latest on the end of the world, at least for the world's newspaper, that is. >> reporter: the last edition of the news of the world was a proud farewell that recalled 168 years of sunday scoops. rupert murdoch bought the paper in 1969 and used its profits to build his vast media empire that now includes fox news, the wall street journal, and the new york post. but this week this scrappy tabloid was engulfed by scandal. though it remained one of the best-selling newspapers in the english speaking world its name is disgraced and the fallout has damaged politicians, the police and the formidable mr. murdoch. the scandal exploded with a teenager murdered in 2002. on monday in london, a private investigator working for the news of the world was accused of h
. rupert murdoch made a bold move in shutting the paper down. >> this is the big question. there are a lot ever reports that rupert murdoch is on his way to london here. not only to handle the "news of the world" closure, but the biggest prize in the media empire is his takeover bid for british broadcaster, b sky b. the takeover bid is now in danger because of the hacking scandal. the government needs to approve the takeover and say they want to look at the phone hacking scandal before they approve the deal. that could scuttle the deal. and it's possible that murdoch will be coming over here to handle it. the very fact that "news of the world" has had to be closed doesn't look good on news international and they have to try to stem the problem where it stands and hope it doesn't spread to any other parts of their media empire. >> thank you, i bet it will sell a lot today. saying thank you and good-bye, appreciate it. >>> a new study just released that exposes the truth about what makes men three times happier in relationships. guess what, it's not sex. ♪ ♪ look at that car, well, it go
of the world. >> reporter: the paper's owner, rupert murdoch whose oarrived i britain sunday to manage the crisis directly. the allegations of phone hacking have been rumbling in the background for several years but exploded last week when a rival paper accused the news of the world from the murdered 13-year-old girl while police were hunting for her hoping she was alive. other alleged targets include the families of fallen soldiers and victims of the 2005 london terror attack. the decision by shutting the paper down took most by surprise, including the editor of the last edition. >> it's a shame that it came to this. as i said this morning, not where we deserve to be. >> reporter: the final edition is a compilation of the paper's triumphs. in the unlikely hope that when the scandal eventually dies down, this is what it will be remembered for. well, a full page apology inside states quite simply, we lost our way. recognition of a scandal that has dented both the reputation mr. murdoch's media empire just as he seeks to expand it here in britain. a government inquiry will examine the ve
into the phones of celebrities. rupert murdoch was seen reading the last ed igts. told 200 people laid off they can apply for jobs elsewhere in the company. a report from london, straight ahead. >>> britain's prince william and his wife catherine are heading home after their whirlwind tour of california and canada. the royal newkne newlyweds left an inpregs. prince william hailed the troops that he called the front lines of a remarkable relationship between the u.s. and britain. >>> a nasa space shuttle is now docked with the international space station for the final time. the "atlantis" is delivering supplies and spare parts. it will return to earth in two weeks marking the end of nasa's shuttle program. >>> all right. it is oppressive. it is unrelenting, and it is getting downright unsafe out there. i'm talking about the heat, of course, in many areas. they are or will be under heat advisories. turning to our meteorologist jacqui jeras to show us where the intense heat will be, jacqui. >> it's terrible and covers so much of country. over a dozen major metropolitan areas having heat indic
" on stands, rupert murdoch is hoping to limit the damage to his media empire. murdoch arrived in london today. his company's british subsidiary closed "news of the world" after reports the newspaper hacked the phone of a missing teenager who was later found dead. >>> in india 13 cars in a packed train jumped the tracks today. rescue officials confirm 28 deaths already and say that number will likely rise as they search the wreckage. more than 100 people are reported hurt. >>> and the public will have two chances to say good-bye to former first lady betty ford who died friday. the first service will be held tuesday in palm desert, california. the second, two days later in michigan. she will be laid to rest alongside her husband on the grounds of the ford presidential museum in grand rapids. >>> atlantis, welcome to the international space station for the last time. >> so far, so good as the shuttle docks with the international space station. the four astronauts received a hearty welcome aboard from the station's current crew there. they have brought along a year's worth of supplies and it's go
on the papers until now. >> rupert murdoch is a talentedd missman, but his portions has grown too powerful and they've abuse thad power. >> reporter: even many the prime minister scrambled to distance himself. >> we are no longer talking about pop tigss or celebrities. we're talking about murder vict victims, terror victims having their phones hacked into. >> reporter: there were more. paper hacked voice mails of the families of britain's soldiers killed in iraq and afghanistan. for celebrities that saw their cell phones hacked and, posed. finally people were listening. actor hugh grant smoke out on the bbc. >> you didn't care who got hurt as long as you were able to sell your newspaper. >> reporter: that's paul mcmull and, a reporter at "the news of the world." >> would you stop at anything to get the story? wowodo anything. >> even breaking the law? >> absolutely. >> reporter: they bribed police for scoops and hacking as many as 4,000 people's phones. on friday, the arrests began starting with andy coleson former editor of "the news of the world" and he would become spokesman for david c
. here's abc'c' jeffrey kofman. >> reporter:r: rupert murdoch rushed to london today to rescue the media empire he's spent his life building. he was reading the last issue of "the news of the world" as he came in. the best receiving tabloid was on the news stands here for the last time. >> i think if you've done wrong, you should face the consequences. >> reporter: the paper brought down by the criminal excesses of its reporters. but in the eyes of many, it was brought down by management who still refuses to accept its own ro role. but murdoch may lose a huge business deal. his plan to take 100% control of britain's b-sky-b satellite network this ask scandal has highlight what people consider a monopoly. 40% of the papers told in this country are ownedy murdoch companies. his holdings stretch around the world. in the u.s., he owns two of the most influential newspapers, book pubbishing, avatar, his, 20th century fox. fox news and fox. owner of "thee simpsons." >> all right, break it up, boys. >> suppose you don't like tabloid newspapers, either. >> reporter: news corporation is headquart
to 7.5 million readers, this is for you. >> the owner of news of the world, rupert murdoch, will fly to london to deal with the scandal personally. quarter before the half. 15 before the hour. >> any of those things. i think it's all legit. 6:45 right now. you can say uft psychiatric look that. >> what's up, chuck? it's all digital. >> obviously there are a lot of on kids used to digital they have a hard time reading a clock. beautiful looking sunday morning. we'll be back with all the ins navigating today's real estate market is complicated. you've seen the signs. that's why having the right real estate agent is more important than ever. at remax.com, you can find experts in short sales or bank-owned properties or commercial real estate, agents who can help speed up the process, no matter how intricate. and that's good news, whether you're trying to sell or hoping to buy. because the only sign you really want to see is "sold." nobody sells more real estate than re/max. visit remax.com today. it works great on wet or dry skin because it's seriously waterproof and ultra sweat-proof. c
told to be cool. >>> there's huge breaking news in england where rupert murdoch's 168-year-old "news of the world" rolled off the presses for the last time. his empire is in jeopardy over a phone hacking scandal. murdock has now spoken publicly for the first time. we'll tell you what he's saying. and big sports news derek jeter getting hit number 3,000 with a home run. what did the guy who caught the ball do with it? we'll tell you about that, coming up. >>> we begin with the make or break meeting at the white house today and the crucial debt negotiations that seem to have hit a serious road block overnight. abc's david kerley following the developments through the night. he is live in washington this morning. i guess it all comes down to the issue of taxes. >> reporter: it does. it is all about taxes. and this is a stunning move by the house speaker. on the eve of some of the biggest policy talks in decades, he basically says, i can't do it. overnight, house speaker john boehner threw a buckck of cold water on the talks, saying that because, quote, the white house will not pursue a
'll bring it to you live. after 168 years, newscorp ceo rupert murdoch has decided to shut down the best selling newspaper because of a scandal. skye news reporter joins us from london with the very latest. >> well, here at the former headquarters of the news of the world, there is very little activity but as you say, after 168 years, the news of the world is no more. but earlier today, about 12:00 u.k. time, rupert murdoch arrived at the headquarters. he was in the front passenger seat of a red range rover. he was holding up and reading what appears to be the latest, the final edition of the news of the world newspaper. he was here relatively briefly and then left shortly after. really, he is here in the u.k. for two main reasons. the first is to take control of the handling of this phone hacking situation. that has really put a cloud over the news of the world newspaper at news international and also has been for -- i think really that is crucial for rupert murdoch and the reason that he is in the u.k. today, the amount of money, revenue that newscorp could bring in did go through, wh
to crush them on the pages of his paper, until now. >> rupert murdoch is a talented businessman, possibly even a genius, but his organization has grown too powerful and they've abuse thad power. >> reporter: even britain's prime minister elected with murdock's help, scram manied to distance himself. >> we are no longer talking about politicians or celebrities. we're talking about murder victims, terror victims having their phones hacked into. it is absolutely disgusting. >> reporter: and there was more. paper hacked voice mails of the families of britain's soldiers killed in iraq and afghanistan. for celebrities that saw their cell phones illegally hacked and been exposed to people offal world, finally people were listening. actor hugh grant smoke out on the bbc. >> you didn't care who got hurt as long as you were able to sell your newspaper. >> reporter: that's paul mcmullin, for more than a decade, a reporter and editor at "the news of the world." >> would you stop at anything to get the story? you would do anything. >> even breaking the law? >> absolutely. >> reporter: we learned they
of the newsstands were sold out of the paper. the question is, right now, what's going to happen to rupert murdoch? he made an appearance at news international, the parent company of news of the world. briefly cameras caught him driving in with his suv there, but the question is, is this going 20 have is a trickle it down effect on his other media companies, and the big thing i want to point out here is that, you know, the main point of contention, it's one thing if you go after celebrity, political figure, public persona, but the thing is -- if you're going after your viewers, your readers, that's a whole other ball game. you know? that's what was the tipping point for a lot of this. >> the prime minister is really upset about its operations. we'll see. because i was told by someone who has legal knowledge that this is going to be a huge deal playing out. >> absolutely. not over yet. >> moving on talking about another story. a cruise ship in russia, sinks. one person dead. 88 missing? and 88 missing or 84 dead? how many are dead here? >> this is the thing. you have this double-decker cruise ship.
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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